DCS: SPITFIRE!

DCS: SPITFIRE!

Official Screenshots The British Spitfire is one of the most iconic fighter aircraft of World War II. Most famous for its role in the Battle of Britain, the Spitfire served as Britain’s primary fighter during the entirety of the war. The Spitfire combines graceful lines, eye-watering dogfight performance, and heavy firepower in its later variants. For DCS World, we are happy to bring you the most accurate and realistic simulation of the Spitfire LF Mk IX ever created. The Spitfire Mk IX was originally developed as a stopgap measure as a response to the appearance of the Focke-Wulf FW 190A. The Spitfire IX is powered by the Merlin 66. This engine produces its best performance at slightly lower altitudes than the older Merlin 61. Spitfires equipped...

Viva Las Vegas

Viva Las Vegas

Just a few passing pics to show what the Nevada map is looking like these days. Here I am going downtown near dusk……….The city looks pretty amazing compared to the old map and gives me hope the Normandy map will be quite special. Pretty constant high 60s for frames....

Intercept near Krymsk

Intercept near Krymsk

After a successful recon flight over two enemy airfields the squadron was tasked to work with an AWACs to perform intercepts against enemy CAS flights. Results were two kills for SQDLDR Squog and unfortunately SQDLDR Stonehouse took damage to a number of systems resulting in a total hydraulics failure and loss of control. He bailed out successfully and got down without injury. Note that SQDLDR Squog should contact the paint shop to finish the squadron skins so he doesn’t have to pinch Capt Todd Pearson’s aircraft...

DCS World Rally Championships…

DCS World Rally Championships…

A new DCS pastime – Motorcross using bike and sidecar

A new DCS pastime – Motorcross using bike and sidecar

73-year-old spitfire mystery solved

73-year-old spitfire mystery solved

More than 70 years after Flight Sergeant Colin Duncan fought his way from the burning cockpit of his Spitfire, its twisted wreckage — spotted from the air by pilots in recent months — is set to become a museum piece. The crash site, in a rarely- visited patch of Litchfield National Park far from established tracks, was described in military records as “rough country” and is likely why Duncan’s plane, unlike many other wrecks, remained undiscovered and unpilfered. The remoteness of the crash site — which is now protected by the Heritage Act — is likely also why rescue crews took five days to reach Duncan after he crashed on June 30, 1943. In following days, his mates dropped him food and cigarettes along with a note saying: “You owe me a beer for...

A very good run………

A very good run………